This English grammar lesson covers some of the common ways that clauses can be joined in English. While there are other acceptable ways to combine clauses, you should defer to the following widely-accepted rules. [Independent]; [Independent]. Example 1: Jane went grocery shopping at Publix; she usually shops at Kroger. Example 2: Jane went grocery shopping…

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Syntax is extremely important in the English language. Minor changes in word order can alter the entire meaning of a sentence. As a general rule, English is a SVO language. The subject, the verb, and the object(s) of a sentence typically appear in that order: Madeline [subject] purchased [verb] the new J.K. Rowling novel [object].…

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A subordinate clause, also known as a dependent clause, begins with either a subordinating conjunction or a relative pronoun. Despite containing both a subject and a verb, a subordinate clause cannot stand on its own as a sentence. It requires additional information in order to complete the thought expressed in the subordinate clause. A subordinate/dependent…

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Last time we talked about noun clauses, groups of words that have the same uses in a sentence as a noun. In this lesson, we’re going to explore some additional ways noun clauses can be used, as well as some related concepts.   Quoted Speech Quoted speech means that you are reproducing exactly what a…

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