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New Years Vocabulary

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New Years Vocabulary

As we begin 2017, we’re going to cover some English words and phrases commonly-associated with the arrival of a new year.   If you need more help with vocabulary for celebrating the New Year, or any other aspect of the English language, contact the English Island in Atlanta. Our caring, passionate ESL teachers can create…

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Holiday Vocabulary Part One

For this week’s lesson, we’re going to explain the meanings of some important end-of-year cultural and religious holidays observed in the United States. Next week, we’ll discuss specific vocabulary words relating to these seasonal traditions.   If you need more help with holiday vocabulary or any other aspect of the English language, contact the English…

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Commonly Confused Prepositional Idioms

Prepositional idioms are phrases where the meaning is determined by the choice of preposition. As with the idiomatic expressions we have looked at in the past, there is no “rule” for which prepositional idiom is correct in a given situation. This is because prepositional idioms have evolved through custom and usage as the English language…

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More American and British Words with the Same Meanings

Many common objects and ideas have different names in American and British English. In a previous lesson, we compared some of these words. In this lesson, we’re going to look at an additional fifty-six pairs, including words that have the same pronunciation but different spellings.   The left column in the chart below contains Standard…

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Introduction to Collocations

Collocations are groups of two or more words that are commonly-used together. These groups of words are largely idiomatic. The “right” and “wrong” words to use in a given collocation have evolved through custom and usage as the English language itself has evolved. Because of this, you should think of collocations as whole units of…

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